Breaking News: #DataViz Headline Challenge Week Two Finalists

This Spring, The New York Times Learning Network’s “What’s Going on in This Graph?” and the American Statistical Association teamed up for the This is Statistics 2022 Spring Contest. Students and educators have the opportunity to showcase their statistical literacy and journalism skills by submitting clear and compelling headlines for New York Times graphs in March’s four weekly challenges. 

Each week, students and educators have the opportunity to analyze a New York Times graph and submit their most compelling statistical headline. A panel of judges — American Statistical Association members and New York Times Learning Network advisors with expertise in data visualization — reviewed the submissions and ranked the top headlines of the week.  

Congratulations to our Week Two Finalists!

High School & Middle School

“Scorching Heat to Chilling Cold: 2021’s Weather Breaks Records” 

Supra K., International Academy East, Troy, Michigan 

  

“All-Time Temperature Records Broken at the Highest Rate in Almost 30 Years” 

Frederic R., School Without Walls HS, Washington D.C. 

Sponsor: Ms. Sylvia 

  

Cool or shine, it’s not divine in 2021: 10.6% of weather records broken in South or West at peak 

Samuel J., Valley Christian High School, San Jose, California 

Sponsor: Claudia Smith 

  

“An outstanding year: temperatures broke 10% of station records in 2021” 

Lucas C.-R., School Without Walls High School, Washington D.C. 

  

“2021 Weather Phenomena Set Unusual Amount of All-Time Temperature Records” 

Cameron M., Valley Christian High School, San Jose, California 

Sponsor: Claudia Smith 

  

“A flurry of records! Heatwaves and cold snaps in 2021 induce all-time temperature records at 10.6% of all U.S weather stations!” 

Ayush P., International Academy East, Troy, Michigan 

Sponsor: Ms. Beski 

  

“2021 the Year of Climate Change: Western States Boil while Central States Freeze” 

Simarjit S., International Academy East, Troy Michigan 

  

“States west of the Mississippi river face record-setting highs and lows. Countless Americans and scientists claim this to be a result of global warming.” 

Ishan N., International Academy East, Troy, Michigan 

  

“2021: A Year Impacted by Record Breaking Temperatures” Angel N., International Academy East, Troy, Michigan 

  

“The june heat wave strikes the us west coast harder than ever before” 

Jayden C., Valley Christian High School, San Jose, California 

  

“Intense weather is breaking U.S temperature records” Jeremiah, Brashier Middle College Charter High School, Simpsonville, South Carolina 

Sponsor: Amy Ballard 

  

“2021 Temperatures Break Records: What the Data Shows” Ella N., Prospect Sierra Middle School, El Cerrito, California 

  

“Flames and Frost: The Distribution of Temperature Record Breakers in the US” 

Brad Z., Valley Christian High School, San Jose, California 

Sponsor: Claudia Smith 

  

“Percentage of US Weather Stations Breaking Heat Records Hits Its Own Record” 

Tevin W., Valley Christian High School, San Jose, California 

Sponsor: Claudia Smith 

  

“Nothing New? Climate change continues to break records in 2021.” 

Cole D., Mt. Lebanon High School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

  

“Let’s go back to 1994: Percent of news stations breaking temperature records reaches rates only seen once before!” 

Josie C., Mount Lebanon High School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Sponsor: Heather Pessy 

  

“Breaking All Time Temperature Records in the US. Too Cold or Too Hot?” 

Ava N., Mount Lebanon High School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

  

“Sweat or Snow: What temperature records were set in 2021” 

Fiona F., Prospect Sierra Middle School, El Cerrito, California 

Sponsor: Beth Alsberg 

  

“Colder in Texas? Hotter in Seattle? How new temperature records are being set all across the US.” 

Henry W., Prospect Sierra Middle School, El Cerrito, California 

  

“2021: The Most Extreme Year for Weather Since 1994” 

Rik M., Valley Christian High School, San Jose, California 

Sponsor: Claudia Smith 

  

“Where in the US do temperatures hit the extreme? Certainly not the East.” 

Karen J., International Academy East, Troy, Michigan 

  

“2021: The Year of Record-Breaking Temperatures” 

Price B., School Without Walls High School, Washington D.C. 

  

“New studies show that June heat waves and February cold snaps are effecting some parts of the US more than others” 

Vishal C., International Academy, Troy, Michigan 

  

“Breaking Thermostats Around the Country” 

Anna H., Pewaukee High School, Pewaukee, Wisconsin 

  

“Welting West and Shivering South: Record Setting Temperatures in America” 

Zoe H., Pewaukee High School, Pewaukee, Wisconsin 

Sponsor: Abigail Bartz 

  

“2021: Breaking Extreme Temperature Records in the U.S.” 

Lucy Y., Valley Christian High School, San Jose, California 

Sponsor: Claudia Smith 

  

“Hot Hands or Cold Feet? Temperature Records Across the States Last Year” 

Serena E., Franklin Regional High School, Export, Pennsylvania 

Sponsor: Mathew Dunlap 

  

“Historically New Temperature Record Broke: Heat Wave Sweeping the West and the Freezing South/Midwest” 

Yindi Z., Valley Christian High School, San Jose, California 

Sponsor: Claudia Smith 

  

“Its Getting Hot in Here! US hotspots that broke temperature records in 2021” 

Mia G., Mt. Lebanon High School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

  

“Unprecedented, extreme cold & heat: U.S. record temperatures in 2021” 

Sanjana J., The Village School, Houston, Texas 

  

Undergraduate

“2021: The Year of Record High Temps in Northwestern US!” 

Kaylee L., Northwestern CT Community College, Winsted, Connecticut 

Sponsor: Crystal Wiggins 

  

“Our Changing Climate: U.S. Temperatures Broke Records in 2021” 

Zoe S., Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 

Sponsor: Jacob Smith 

  

“Record-Breaking Heats and Colds Across the U.S. in 2021: An Anomaly?” 

Faustina C., Columbia University, New York, New York 

  

“Highs and lows: 2021 shattered temperature records across the U.S.” 

Eleanor L., Columbia University, New York, New York 

  

“2021: a new all-time record of all-time temperature records” 

Pierre C., Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, France 

Sponsor: Nadine Lynn-Martinsons 

  

“Does climate change justify the extreme temperature duality in the USA?” 

Tristan T., Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, France 

  

“Dealt with the most temperature records in 2021, can we handle these weather extremes?” 

Anh N., University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 

 

Finalists include the highest scoring 10% of submissions for each age group and all tied submissions at that same score. 

Thank you to all who participated in the second weekly challenge!  

Students, there is still time to compete in the third weekly challenge! The deadline to submit is Wednesday, March 23 at 6 pm ET/3 pm PT. Review this week’s featured graph and submit your headline here 

Teachers can participate, too! Click here to briefly tell us how you use the New York Times Learning Network’s “What’s Going On In This Graph?” or the 2022 #DataViz Headline Challenge in your classroom. Your response may be featured online and you will be entered into a random drawing for a gift card.

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