Back to School with Stats: ‘What’s Going On in This Graph?’ is Now Weekly!

Are you taking a statistics course this year? If you are, congratulations! You’re in for a fun and challenging course that will build important skills for your future, no matter what career you choose. Here’s what you can expect in the year ahead.  

But don’t worry, even if you aren’t enrolled for a statistics course right now, you can still build your skills! 

“What’s Going On in This Graph” was established to help you practice your critical thinking, math and statistics skills–plus, it’s fun! As it relaunches for the 2018-19 school year, it is becoming a weekly feature for students and teachers from The New York Times Learning Network and the American Statistical Association. 

Starting today, a new graph will be released from a recent article from The New York Times every Wednesday. The graph is stripped of its contextual information and it’s up to you to decipher its meaning. The following day, a live moderation will take place in the comments section of the article. Then, on Friday, the article’s title and meaning will be revealed. Are you up for the challenge?  

A Classroom Resource 

 Teachers, “What’s Going On in This Graph” is a powerful activity that is now even easier to fit into your curriculum. You’ll also be provided a sneak peek of the content each tuesday. By analyzing each weekly new graph, students have the opportunity to build confidence and acquire new conceptual understanding that will become more sophisticated over time.  

Here’s how other teachers have implemented the activity. 

Look for each week’s new graph here, and join the conversation online using #NYTGraphChat.  

View the full schedule of “What’s Going On In This Graph” features for the 2018-19 school year.  

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Related Posts

Public Health Data Challenge

Public Health Data Challenge: Congratulations to our Winners!

This fall in the Public Health Data Challenge, 91 teams made up of 303 students submitted their recommendations on how local officials should fight the national opioid epidemic after analyzing the CDC’s Multiple Cause of Death (Detailed Mortality) data set.    Students recommended creative and thoughtful solutions for local officials including increasing the availability of naloxone…

0 comments
Untitled design (16)

3 Statistics Lessons from a Summer as a Science Journalist

Irineo Cabreros is an AAAS Mass Media Fellow with the sponsorship of the American Statistical Association. He spent 10 weeks this summer training as a science journalist with Slate in its New York City offices. This summer I had the opportunity to write for the science desk at Slate magazine as an AAAS Mass Media Fellow sponsored…

0 comments

Comments are closed.