Statistics Degrees Offer High Salaries and Financial Stability, Study Finds

Those who study statistics not only get a great return on their college investment, but the promise of financial security throughout their careers, according to a recent report by Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce.

Among its key findings, the Center found that recent graduates of STEM degree programs earn the highest wages and have the highest career wage growth. On average, entry-level STEM major grads earn $43,000 compared to $30,000 or less for liberal arts majors (Fig. 1.1).

Wages

 

Within the STEM category, statistics majors are among those with the best career financial stability. By mid-career, those with a bachelor’s degree in statistics are likely to earn more than education majors who have attained a graduate degree. Furthermore, statisticians who earn a graduate degree can make upwards of $100,000 annually, or more, according to the study (Fig. 3.41).

Wages2

 

Find the full Georgetown report here.

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