Data-Driven Government Means Greater Role for Statisticians, Says White House Chief Data Scientist

Statisticians have been the backbone of how the country has thought about data for years, and their role in an increasingly data-driven society will grow even more important, said White House Chief Data Scientist DJ Patil.

Addressing one of the largest annual gatherings of statisticians, Dr. Patil told attendees of JSM2015 the field of statistics is changing, and that will lead to even more opportunity for statisticians, including in public service, where the role of statistician is critical in evaluating policy.

How do we transform data into better insights and policy, asked Dr. Patil? That will continue to be an exciting challenge for statisticians, data scientists and others in the field of data, he said.

Dr. Patil encouraged students of statistics and data science to pursue careers in public service where there are unique opportunities to make an impact in a broad number of areas, from healthcare to community services.

Watch Dr. Patil’s full address below:

 

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