Statistics: The Career of the Future

Statistician is listed among the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ fastest growing careers in 2018 and it’s predicted to grow 33 percent by 2026. During that same period, jobs are only expected to grow by 7.4 percent. In 2016, the median statistician made over $80,000, much higher than average $50,620.

It’s a great time to be a statistician!

Statistics graduates are even being hired by some companies on a freelance basis. Even if you don’t want to pursue a career as a statistician, statistical literacy is becoming a basic skill that can give you a competitive edge in any field.  Even taking a single statistics course can give you a basic understanding that can prove invaluable.

At the current graduation rate for statisticians, there may not be enough skilled workers to satisfy the need for statistical analysis and data mining skills. To meet the demand, universities are adding new programs in data science and statistics.

Interested in learning more about careers in statistics? Check out how these statisticians are making a difference.


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